College football coach dies after Parkinson’s battle

He really took the time to get to know everybody.”

Daniels wrote about how Horton came to his high school in Indiana to meet him and how he later helped ease the player’s cross-country move to North Carolina.

Their struggle with the disease also inspired Maura to make the lives of other Parkinson’s patients better.

Horton, 58, spent a decade coaching at Boston College and six years at North Carolina State University. “He was a guy that could be tough as a coach, but he’d ask how your family was doing.

One of the most emotional letters came from former Boston College player DuJuan Daniels, a national scout for the New England Patriots.

If you knew Horton or want to share a message, the family asks that you email walkermp@me.com.

“When I sat down with your dad that day at my school, I knew he was the coach that I wanted to follow,” he wrote to Horton’s daughters.

“They need to be who they are going to be but with the values that Don wanted them to have: education and perseverance.”

“He would be very proud of these young men for helping take care of his girls,” Maura Horton said.

Even after they parted ways, Daniels wrote, Horton called him twice a month in the 14 years that passed since his last game at Boston College.

What worries Horton’s wife most is whether Libby, 13, and Hadley, 8, will know who their father really was.

“I am happy to call you two my ‘little sisters.’ “

“I can assure you that your dad, Don Horton, had a heart of solid gold. It was his diagnosis that drove the Hortons to “complete the vision” of what their family was going to be, his wife said. The coach offered him career advice and treated him like “part of his family.”

One day, after an NC State game, Horton’s limited dexterity prevented him from being able to button his shirt. Many of the letters noted the same thing and suggested why: Horton believed in his players, or his men, as he called them.

Football wasn’t the only thing Horton cared about, he added: “He cared about school, he cared about your family, he cared about you, the kid he was welcoming into his family.

Hadley only knew him with this disease. “I feel very protective of the girls, and I want them to know how loved they were and how special he was, to be able to be those kind of human beings that will change the world, too.”

“We keep saying over and over we’re going to be all right. They sought in vitro fertilization, and Hadley was born.

A dozen or so former players sent the family letters describing what the coach meant to each of them.

When Zukauskas, now a high school football coach in Massachusetts, learned of Horton’s illness, he called the coach’s wife, Maura Horton, to see how he could help.

Zukauskas, Ricky Brown and Al Washington, all former players from Boston College, set up a GoFundMe page in April to raise money for hospital expenses and an education fund for Horton’s two daughters. I’m not going to give in,” the 46-year-old said between tears.

“I knew he would look after me, just like he promised my mom, sister and grandmother he would with me being hundreds and hundreds of miles away from the only place I had ever known,” Daniels wrote.. You two, along with your mom, Maura, are forever entrenched in it,” Daniels wrote.

When Daniels suffered a career-ending knee injury years later, Horton was there to support him, he said. When Horton went into a hospice home on May 15, family friend Melanie Walker offered a way for the girls to remember their father forever. One of his players, Russell Wilson, now quarterback for the Seattle Seahawks, quietly came over to help the coach.

The story left Horton embarrassed, but it inspired his wife to create MagnaReady, a line of shirts with magnetic buttons for people with disabilities.

In addition to her work as the MagnaReady CEO and fighting to raise Parkinson’s awareness, Maura Horton is fighting to keep the memory of her husband alive for her girls.

“With Coach Horton, it was the way he made us feel outside the meeting rooms and practice fields,” said former Cleveland Browns offensive lineman Paul Zukauskas. I’m not letting in, because it’ll just be me single parenting. As of Wednesday, the fund had raised more than $42,000 for the family.

Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan, Tampa Bay Buccaneers offensive lineman Gosder Cherilus and former New York Giants defensive end Mathias Kiwanuka are among Horton’s former players who have donated to the cause.

Horton’s wife hopes his legacy will be a lasting one, for their daughters and the world. He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2006 and retired from the football field in 2013. Ten years after his diagnosis, Horton died surrounded by his two daughters and his wife.

“In a football world where players are treated as numbers, you treated us as people, and stood out,” wrote Ryan Utzler, former running back at Boston College.

“People can make such a difference in such a short time in life,” she said. She asked friends, family and former players to write letters to Horton’s daughters, sharing their favorite memories of the coach.

Daniels said he felt safe and cared for

Kian Kent

Kian Kent

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Kian Kent

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